Library

Mon: 10AM – 8PM
Tues & Wed: 10AM – 5PM
Thu: 2PM  –  8PM
Fri & Sat: 10AM – 2PM
Sun: Closed

Debra Kamecke
Director
518-622-9864
cairolibrary720@gmail.com

Dean Lavin
President of Board of Trustees

 

Board of Trustees Position
Dean Lavin President
Alan Veverka Vice President
Cathy Hempstead Secretary
Mary Finneran Trustee
Trustee Trustee

Library Director
Debra Kamecke

The New Cairo Public Library opened on July 16, 2012. It is a totally made in America project!

The Cairo Public Library was founded in 1963 and has the special feature of a weekly children’s story hour.

The function of the Cairo Public Library is to provide the Cairo community with access to a balanced collection of books and other materials to serve their educational, cultural, and recreational needs.

The Board of Trustees meet the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 9:30am in the Community Room of the New Library.

Get your library card

The library card is one of the most important school supplies. Libraries are an essential service for the nation’s children. Libraries bridge the digital divide by providing a full range of information and services to children and adult learners. Libraries offer free access to important educational resources such as online homework resources, access to online databases, and e-books. Libraries continue to find ways to bring value to their communities. A library card is one of the “smartest cards” you can possess.

Did you know...

Did you know...

Cairo is home to the oldest geologic site in the world, with evidence of a prehistoric forest dating back roughly 387 million years. In 2012, an archaeological dig at a stone quarry on town property discovered the remains of some of the earliest trees to evolve.  These Devonian period fossil root systems form the footprint of an ancient stand of trees belonging to the world’s oldest known forest. Evidence of an extinct, palm-like tree named cladoxylopsid was discovered, as well as conifer relative (archaeopteris) that may be the missing link between trees that reproduce with spores (like ferns) and the seed bearing trees we know today.

(Photo from: Claude Haton.)